Category Archives: Just Stuff

Celebrating the Music & Legacy of Harry Chapin

Join host, Jeff Pulver on Thursday, July 15th for a celebration of the Music and Legacy of Harry Chapin. This will be a fundraiser for the charity Harry co-founded, WhyHunger.

The show will be co-hosted by Jen Chapin, taking place on the virtual stage at Jeff’s Place and broadcast LIVE starting at 2PM Eastern. Free Tickets are available at pulver.com.  Direct link to the event information is here: https://www.pulver.com/harry-chapin-event

During the show, we will be having conversations about Harry with Bill Ayres, Jason Chapin, Dom Famularo, Rick Korn, David Seitz, and Hillary Zuckerberg. Harry’s songs will be performed by: Aly Way, Caoimhe Byrne, Colm Gavin, Doug DeJoe, Emily Sangder, Jason Colannino, John McMenamin, Madison Muller, Ryan Star, Scott Sivakoff, Tempting Murphy, and Wes Hamil.

Magic will Always Happen

Magic will always happen for it resides in the hearts of beings everywhere!

This month marks the beginning of the 15th year of the digital publication known as The Magic Happens Magazine it is also the final edition of the same.

The owner/publishers have decided to dedicate their energy to other dreams.

For this edition, the writers were provided with the following prompts:

PAPER – CARDINAL

STRUCTURE – BEGINNINGS/ENDINGS

Here are my offerings:

The Paper it’s Printed On

The Paper Chase

The Summer Daily Planet

The Magic Never Ends

The magazine will remain available until at least the end of summer.

Thank you to the legions of loyal followers, we did this for you.  Thank you to all those who participated in my many interviews/podcasts for the magazine.

It has been an honor and a privilege to serve as Editor for the past few years. This is a magical journey I shall not soon forget.

Love, Annette Rochelle Aben, Editor

The Magic Happens Magazine

Beads and No Socialising

Modesty forbids me from entitling an article, ‘Why on earth do I need to
hire Tallis Steelyard to run my evening!’ There again, I barely need to, I
am far more likely to be contacted by somebody desperate for me to enliven
what would otherwise be a long and tedious evening than I am to be harangued
as a waste of money.
But it was listening to Maljie and several other ladies discussing these
matters that provoked me to write. Here in Port Naain, there are any number
of groups who meet for various purposes. We have everything, we have
philosophical and debating societies, groups who meet to chat together as
they knit, political clubs dedicated to the overthrow of civilisation as we
know it, we even have literary and poetry societies. Frankly, I wouldn’t rate
any group more highly than any other. They meet a need. People can talk, get
things off their chests, keep abreast with what is going on and return home
feeling that they have had a pleasant enough evening. Frankly what more can
you ask? Perhaps the best carrot cake I have eaten was at a meeting of a
political club I was asked to address (I can no longer remember why) and the
shrewdest questions were asked by a group of ladies who never dropped a
stitch as they listened to me squirm as I tried to answer.
Given the number of groups that there are, Aea alone knows what possessed a
very previous incumbent to from a ladies social circle for the Shine of Aea
in her Aspect as the Personification of Tempered Enthusiasm. I suppose it
served two purposes. One was that it built a sense of community amongst
those worshipping or otherwise linked to the shrine. Secondly, I suppose he
hoped it would keep them out of trouble. At least whilst the ladies were
attending the social circle meetings they weren’t out drinking and fighting.
The problem is that these societies need people who will drive them. People
who will do the basic work that is necessary. In the case of the social
circle, it wasn’t as if there was any problem booking rooms, they always met
in the shrine. Similarly, they had their regular evening so they didn’t have
to tell people when to come to the meeting, everybody knew already. Yet the
most important job, the most difficult one, was to find some form of
interesting entertainment.
There is a list. It isn’t long, it isn’t official, but everybody who gets
the job as secretary of one of these societies soon manages to get their own
copy. It consists of the names of the people who are worth inviting to
speak. If your group meets monthly, allowing for two meetings without
speakers when you ‘entertain yourselves,’ that still means you need ten
speakers a year. Also, you don’t want speakers coming back too often, so the
list really needs fifty names. Frankly, you’d be lucky if your list had a
score of speakers on it.
So secretaries improvise. They ask the friends of friends to speak. They
listen to gossip and if somebody is mentioned as being comparatively
interesting, they will hastily book them. Soon desperation sets in. Elderly
clerics are dragooned into telling their tales of ministry in the wilder or
more distant climes. Various performing artists will be summoned, not to
perform (because they charge for that) but to talk about being a performer.
Now I have no doubt that you might be an excellent musician, but it doesn’t
mean you can talk wittily and entertainingly about it. Indeed the social
circle once invited a mime to talk about their art. Frankly, it would have
gone better if they had given the talk in mime but instead, in a dull
monosyllabic drone, they showed by their talk exactly why they get their
mouth shut whilst working.
Then you have the old stalwart, arts and crafts. Few painters can pain
quickly enough and well enough to hold an audience, but there are other more
esoteric crafts. I have known people who created mosaics from the glass you
get from broken wine bottles. Obviously, there is black, green, amber and
some rare cobalt blue as well as the more usual transparent. Each piece is
cut to shape with a special bladed hammer that reminds me of nothing as much
as a toffee hammer. The piece is then filed perfectly to shape. One couple
had a mosaic in their hallway, the centrepiece of the room. It looked
absolutely stunning but it had taken fifteen years to create. I can think of
few things more boring that having them take over an hour to explain how
they did it.
Mind you, Maljie claimed that she had a speaker who could beat them for
tedium. This lady came to discuss making bead bracelets. The talk consisted
of watching her slide one bead at a time on a piece of thread, whilst she
told you what colour the bead was. It may have been that the sequence of
colours had some ritual significance because when the ladies were allowed to
try doing their own, Maljie was most sternly talked to for altering the
sequence.
Which brings us to the most important part of these associations, the
comradeship, the meeting and greeting, the chatting together. Whether the
group gathers to share herbal infusions and coffee along with some nice
cakes or to drink pleasant wine along with some spicy nibbles, doesn’t
matter. It is the time spent chatting, relaxing in decent company. For some
ladies, it might be the only chance they get to unburden themselves to
another sympathetic lady. If you accomplish nothing else, make sure that the
event includes plenty of time for this sort of thing.
Yet you’ll find groups where members do not linger. Once the speaker has
spoken, many of the members flee. I have pondered this phenomena. Setting
aside the most unlikely option, that they attend the meeting purely because
they are utterly fascinated by the speakers (given the very diverse nature
of the speakers I cannot imagine anybody being interested in them all) then
all I can think is that they regard the event as ‘somewhere I have to be
seen’. Some of these meetings as so dull I would only attend them if I
desperately needed an alibi. I could have serious concerns about both the
social life and social priorities of the person who felt that it was
necessary to be ‘seen’ at those meetings.
But sometimes the speaker can rescue matters and help build the community.
Maljie mentioned the occasion when there was a talk about knitting. During
the talk, the oil in the lantern ran out and light was provided,
inadequately, by a couple of candles. Somewhere in the gloom was a speaker
who was discussing ‘competitive knitting.’ Apparently, this is remarkably
popular in some circles and is taken inexplicably seriously. Horrendous
crimes can be committed as those at the leading edge of this particular
fancy cut corners or cheat to achieve award-winning results. Apparently, the
concubines of Partannese bandit lords have been known to cease their
poisonings long enough to write strong letters complaining that mixing
alternate bands of knitting fool, faggoting and tricot is not merely poor
taste but is absolutely unethical.
During this talk, Maljie was awakened from slumber by a voice whispering,
“Maljie, are you awake.”
“No. Let’s go down the street to the nearest public house and get a drink.”
Legend is silent as to whether anybody remained to propose a vote of thanks
to the speaker, who droned on as her audience stealthily left. Still, I am
assured it was a truly splendid night in the four ale bar and everybody
agreed that this is what being a ladies social circle was all about.
And now a brief note from Jim Webster. It’s really just to inform you that
I’ve just published a full Tallis Steelyard novel. Yes, the rumours are true.
Tallis Steelyard, the man who considered jotting down a couple of anecdotes
to be ridiculously hard work, and considered the novella form to be the very
pinnacle of literary labour, has been cozened into producing a novel.
It is, ‘Tallis Steelyard. A Fear of Heights.’
In this novel, recounted by Tallis Steelyard in his own inimitable manner,
we discover what happens when the hierarchy plots to take control of the
Shrine to Aea in her Aspect as the Personification of Tempered Enthusiasm.
Will the incumbent be exiled to a minor fane in the far north? Will Tallis
end up having to do a proper job? Does ordination and elevation beckon for
Maljie?
This story includes the Idiosyncratic Diaconate, night soil carts,
Partannese bandit chieftains, a stylite, a large dog and some over-spiced
food. On top of this, we have not one but two Autocephalous Patriarchs and a
theologically sanctioned beggar.
Available both for kindle and in Paperback.

Cleaning Up

Sandi the Broom is a sweeper. According to Mutt, who I suspect may be
considered definitive in these matters, she was the first. As far as I can
make out, she abandoned what had been her home and at the age of about six
or seven took to the streets to fend for herself. At some point, she acquired
a broom. Whether she brought it to the streets with her or picked it up
there, nobody has been able to tell me. Also, within a week or two of
arriving on the street, she found a bucket as well.
Her method of working is simple. She will start at one end of a street and
just sweep it clean until she arrives at the other end. Horse muck and
similar goes into the bucket. Small coins and other potentially valuable
items are tucked into pockets secreted about her clothing.
Obviously, you need to choose your streets. Ropewalk would be perfect were it
not for the fact that it’s too busy to even consider. (Although she does
occasionally contemplate sweeping it late at night. Only her well-developed
sense of self-preservation has prevented her.) Equally obvious was the fact
that there was no point just going back to the start and beginning again.
She developed a ’round’. Six streets which she would sweep, one a day. The
sixth and last street brought her back to the start again. This allowed
debris to accumulate, thus meaning it was worth sweeping again.
Another issue was the nature of the street. You didn’t want something too
busy or it gets dangerous. Similarly, quiet streets never accumulate much.
The perfect street is busy at times, has at least some houses with gardens,
and is a comparatively prosperous area. After all, you didn’t want a street
inhabited by dwellers who would happily crawl the length of it on their
hands and knees looking for a ten dreg piece they thought they’d dropped.
After a few weeks on the streets, she started to build up a network of
customers. Certain houses contained a keep gardener who was happy to buy her
bucket of horse muck and miscellaneous sweepings for the compost heap.
Similarly whilst coins are of universal utility, other things that she finds
can be cashed in if you know your markets. On one occasion it was obvious
that she was following an absconding troubadour, doubtless fleeing an
outraged husband. She found two guitar plectrums, three spare strings, one
gent’s shoe, and perhaps a vintenar in miscellaneous copper coins.
Knowing your customers is important in this trade. The perfect house to sell
your bucket of assorted sweepings is one where the gentleman of the house is
a keep gardener. As you knock confidently at the side door you can be sure
that the maid will sigh, roll her eyes in good-natured exasperation, and
summon her master. He will beam with pleasure, tell the cook to give you a
new loaf, split, and plastered with butter. He will personally cut a good
chunk from the cheese which sits on the table in the dining room. There’s
even the hope of an apple from the maid.
If your customer is just the gardener, then he’ll doubtless be pleased, but
he lacks authority with the cook. Thus when he comes out of the house to pay
you, he’ll rather shiftily hand you the loaf from the bottom of the bread
bin, no butter, and the last of the cheese before the mouse-traps claim it.
Then when it comes to selling what you’ve found, shoes are easy. Several of
the rag shops take them. They don’t pay a lot, twenty-five dregs at most.
But then, from their point of view, it’s a speculative investment. One-legged
purchasers aren’t common. There’s a chance that you’ll get a mate to the one
you’ve bought, at which point you’re in the money. It’s even possible for
the owner to appear and to buy it back. But in this latter case, they never
pay well, and only with considerably chuntering and moaning. As the owner of
one of these emporia commented to me, “There are times I do wonder why I
bother. The trade isn’t worth the candle.”
Otherwise, for Sandi the Broom it was a case to knowing your market. One
second-hand shop gave her a good blouse that almost fitted her in return for
the plectrums and guitar strings. In other cases, she has received a reward
for finding a glass eye whilst a gold tooth is a genuine treasure to be
secreted away as a reserve.
On top of all this, she is also a ‘watcher.’ That’s how I came across her.
She will keep an eye out for things and pass the news on to Mutt. Obviously,
the streets she cleans have their own watchers, small children innocently
playing, or sitting silently under the eaves. But from Mutt’s point of view,
these are a nuisance. They work of other, doubtless competing, aspiring
crime lords. Sandi covers more ground, but in less detail than these other
watchers, but still, any information she sells him enables him to keep an
eye on the area.
Mutt once asked me to pass on a message to her and to buy her a meat pie as
part of her wages. (Marvel at the confidence he reposes in me!) As she
devoured the pie we discussed work and life on the streets. She does have
ambitions. One possible way forward is to go into service with one of the
houses on ‘her’ streets. She has kept her eyes and ears open and there are
houses she would work in. She makes a point of treating housekeepers and
butlers like the aristocracy they are should she meet them in the street,
and even downstairs maids will get a polite little curtsy from her.
Her confident expectation is that in the next year or so she will be offered
a place as, ‘the girl as does’ in one of her chosen houses. This will
guarantee her a bed, a roof that doesn’t leak, and regular meals. Ensconced
in such unaccustomed luxury she pointed out that if she couldn’t progress to
be a housekeeper in her own right, it would be her fault.
On the other hand, I could detect signs that part of her would regret
abandoning her own business and the independent life. As she said, if she
found a few more gold teeth she might set up a stall of her own, and
perhaps, if Lady Luck smiled on her, open a second-hand emporium in an empty
shop. As she said, she knows Mutt, he owes her, and with his street children
behind her, she could soon stock it.
And now a brief note from Jim Webster. It’s really just to inform you that
I’ve just published two more collections of stories.
The first, available on kindle, is ‘Tallis Steelyard, preparing the ground,
and other stories.’
More of the wit, wisdom, and jumbled musings of Tallis Steelyard. Meet a
vengeful Lady Bountiful, an artist who smokes only the finest hallucinogenic
lichens, and wonder at the audacity of the rogue who attempts to drown a
poet! Indeed after reading this book, you may never look at young boys and
their dogs, onions, lumberjacks or usurers in quite the same way again.
A book that plumbs the depths of degradation, from murder to folk dancing,
from the theft of pastry cooks to the playing of a bladder pipe in public.
The second, available on Kindle or as a paperback, is ‘Maljie. Just one
thing after another.’
Once more Tallis Steelyard chronicles the life of Maljie, a lady of his
acquaintance. Discover the wonders of the Hermeneutic Catherine Wheel,
marvel at the use of eye-watering quantities of hot spices. We have bell
ringers, pop-up book shops, exploding sedan chairs, jobbing builders,
literary criticism, horse theft, and a revolutionary mob. We also discover
what happens when a maiden, riding a white palfrey led by a dwarf, appears
on the scene.

A Licence to Perform

I confess that morning, as I breakfasted on the steam packet, the
Unrivaled, I awaited the rising tide with growing trepidation. Nonetheless,
from my position aft of the funnel, I could see no suspiciously casual groups
of overly muscled men moving in our direction. Indeed all our party arrived
on time, boarded and we cast off at the hour appointed.
But we were barely fifty yards from the wharf when there was a commotion, a
lady with two men and a handcart was waving and shouting at us. It was
Nilinda. She is a very accomplished marimba player. In all candor, she was
the person to go to in Port Naain if you needed a marimba playing. Whilst
her professional life was settled, her private life was less stable. She had
been the mistress of Hulan Dorca for at least fifteen years. During this
period Hulan had courted and married two wives, and Nilinda had raised no
objections. But for some reason when Hulan married his third wife (He had
divorced the two previous incumbents prior to this. Hulan may have practiced
serial polygamy but was never actually bigamous.) Nilinda seems to have
objected strongly. Apparently, she didn’t object to the marriage, she
objected to Hulan and his new wife going away for a week’s honeymoon.
Now whether she had expected to be invited along I don’t know. Indeed I
didn’t dare ask. But she took this slight (as she saw it) very badly. So
badly that when the happy couple left, Nilinda summoned Master Bullifant to
the house. He was at the time an auctioneer but did house clearances as
well. Because she had a key, she let him into the house, he appraised the
contents, (everything but the marimba) and listed everything for sale. Three
days later, he’d cleared the building. Even the cracked chamber pots stored
in the servants’ attic had been taken and listed. The sale was a big
success. Nilinda watched it from a shadowy corner at the back. Bullifant
paid her cash, less the seller’s commission, before she left.
The next morning when she awoke, in a house empty save for the marimba, the warm
glow of satisfaction that she had felt the previous day had evaporated
somewhat. Nilinda decided that she might be better savouring her victory at
some distance from Port Naain. Then remembering our enterprise she decided,
not entirely unreasonably, that it would proceed better with a marimba
player. So she stepped outside into the street, pointed to two men at random
and said, “You and you, fetch that handcart from over there and accompany me
to the docks with my marimba.”
The two men obliged. I suppose you can see their point. There was a
possibility this woman might pay them. Certainly, there was a story here and
they could probably get free drinks on the strength of it. Also at the end
of the day, there was the opportunity to sell on the perfectly good handcart
that she had apparently gifted them with.
With a marimba and one carpetbag, Nilinda and her small party almost ran to
the docks. After all, Hulan and his third wife were expected back that day.
When she saw us leave she was a little put out and tried to attract our
attention from the wharf. She succeeded in this and hired a boatman to take
her, her carpetbag and the marimba out to the Unrivalled. She even paid off
the two men who had pushed her handcart. They stood on the wharf and watched
her leave. Then over a beer paid for by their earnings, they decided that
they would go into business together. After all, they got along well, worked
together amicably, and had acquired a handcart. Prosperity beckoned.
Nilinda came aboard the Unrivalled and announced she had succumbed to our
blandishments and would indeed join our party. I shrugged this off. She was
a musician, she was Old Jerky’s problem. He merely pointed out to her that
she got the same rate of pay as everybody else and if she didn’t like it,
she could swim ashore taking her marimba with her. Graciously she acquiesced
to his terms.
The voyage itself was trying. The Unrivalled tended to roll a bit and many
of our party were seasick. Unfortunately, Nilinda seemed immune to the
condition and whatever the state of the sea she would insist on practicing
her marimba, and demanding that other musicians practiced with her. Thus it
was with some relief that I stepped ashore after our voyage on the steam
packet. Yes, steam might be more reliable than the wind, and there is a
certain majesty in the thrashing of the paddlewheels. Unfortunately the
Unrivalled had carried hides into Port Naain and then immediately loaded our
company and set off south. The stench below decks was not to be described,
never mind experienced, whilst above decks we had a lot of sick people
hanging over the rail being ill to a music accompaniment.  I will merely
point out that whilst the little ship did not lack ambiance, it was an
ambiance that clung, and it took three washings before I could get it out of
my shirts.
As we steamed between Ragged Head and the Snaggles I thought there was some
mistake. On the south bank was Travitant Quay, a well-appointed little town
with quays and wharfs and all the panoply of thriving commerce. On the north
bank was Slipshade which appeared to lack all these things. Indeed Slipshade
had a disreputable air, the only thing in good repair seemed to be the
defenses. Still, when our captain blew the whistle, a bunch of sturdy rogues
lounging on the beach pushed out a floating jetty and we drew alongside
that.
With almost indecent haste the crew got us and our impedimenta onto the
jetty and then backed away, apparently keen to collect another cargo of
hides from Travitant Quay.  I advanced along the jetty, wearing my most
winning smile. “Greetings. I am Tallis Steelyard and we have come to perform
for you.”
There was a general scratching of heads at this announcement. Finally, one of
ne’er-do-wells was pushed forward as a spokesman. “What you performing?”
“Wonders such as the fine metropolis of Slipshade has never seen before.
Dancers of breath-taking beauty, singers who can sing songs which will haunt
your dreams, musicians who can charm the birds down from the trees. Plus of
course a pie-eating contest and consummate prestidigitation fresh from the
theatres of Port Naain.”
“Ah, pie-eating.”
Well, it was good to see we’d touched a chord there.
“You’ll have to go up to the Keep to get a license to perform. Just leave
your stuff here, we’ll look after it.”
I’m certain they would. The minute our backs were turned they’d diligently
search through our possessions, find anything of value and treasure it as if
it was their own. As it was I left the dancers to look after our luggage,
with Old Jerky and his band to protect the integrity of both luggage and
dancers. I took Flobbard and Malinflua with me to the Keep. Malinflua at
least was presentable, and she’d given evidence of considerable
intelligence. Not only that but frankly I didn’t really trust either of them
out of my sight. Flobbard’s larcenous instincts tended to override his
common sense at times.
It is a steep walk up to the keep, the road tends to wind backward and
forwards as if reluctant to be associated with so grim a destination. At the
gate we were nodded through, the dozing villain on guard barely bothering to
open his eyes long enough to look at us. He merely pointed to the main
tower, grunted and went back to sleep again.
As we entered the main hall of the tower we arrived to a shouting match. As
I stood at the door I could see Darstep Balstep, lord of the keep, seated on
his great chair obviously listening to some dispute. It might be he was
sitting in judgment. Certainly, he was wearing a scarlet cloak over his
battered leather armour and on his head he wore a heavy silver headband to
hold his hair in place. It was obviously a prestigious piece of jewelry,
it had three large stones in it, each perhaps the size of the end joint of a
man’s thumb. In a more well-regarded setting, you might even have described
it as a crown.
In front of him, there were two groups of men engaged in furious argument.
Nobody had pulled a knife but from the way the insults were flying it was
purely a matter of time. Then Balstep saw us, or rather I suspect he saw
Malinflua.
“Oy, you by the door.”
I placed my hand on my chest as if to ask if it was me he was addressing.
“No, you streak of misery, the woman. Who is she?”
Malinflua stepped forward, “Do you mean me, Sire?”
“Well I don’t mean the beslubbering flap-mouthed moon calf you came in
with.”
I rather assumed it was Flobbard he was referring to at this point.
“Do you have a name woman? Or do I have to keep shouting ‘hey you!”
With this Balstep leapt to his feet and strode majestically through the
crowd towards us. Or at least that is what I assume his intention was. I am
reasonably positive he hadn’t intended to trip over something, whether his
cloak, his feet, or the feet of some other person, and measure his length on
the floor. His crown fell off his head and rolled across the floor towards
us. I ignored it and dashed forward to help him up, only to recoil from his
breath. He was impressively drunk.
“Where’s my bluidy crown?”
“Here your lordship.” Malinflua had pushed through the crowd next to me and
offered him the crown.
He stared owlishly at it and then took it off her. “The stones have gone.”
With this another argument started up. His followers split into rival groups
accusing other groups of stealing the stones. Then one, perhaps more sober
than the others shouted, “Search the woman, she picked the crown up.”
Everybody turned to Malinflua, who seemed to have acquired a wicked-looking
knife with a blade of obvious utility. “I’m not having you drunken sots
fumbling with me, but find a woman and I’ll let her search me.”
There was a long silence as those present contemplated the options open to
them. Finally one of the women who had been serving table stepped forward
and methodically searched Malinflua. The woman turned to Balstrep. “She
hasn’t got the stones on her.”
Malinflua stepped back next to me and ostentatiously sheathed the knife.
“Right, now you better search my two companions as well, before some drunken
fool makes more silly accusations. The serving woman, with a brief glance at
Balstrep, did as Malinflua suggested.
“Neither of these two has the stones either.”
“Well, who’s got the bluidy things then?” Balstrep asked, a little
plaintively.
“Sire, I am a poet
Not a watchman.
Still my advice,
Should I owe it?
Search the men of your clan.
In a thrice.”
I bowed. “I trust we have your permission to withdraw and prepare the
entertainment was have brought for your delight.”
“Entertainment?” Balstrep sounded suspicious.
“Pie eating contests, beautiful dancers and the usual sort of thing.”
Balstrep seemed to be contemplating my offer. “Aye, shut the door on your
way out. When I’ve got this lot searched I’ll be down to see what’s going
on. Will there be any poetry, I’ve always been fond of the rondel form?”
And now we’d better hear from Jim Webster.
So here I am again with another blog tour. Not one book but three.
The first is another of the Port Naain Intelligencer collection. These
stories are a bit like the Sherlock Holmes stories. You can read them in any
order.
On the Mud. The Port Naain Intelligencer
When mages and their suppliers fall out, people tend to die. This becomes a
problem when somebody dies before they manage to pass on the important
artifact they had stolen. Now a lot of dangerous, violent or merely amoral
people are searching, and Benor has got caught up in it all. There are times
when you discover that being forced to rely upon a poet for back-up isn’t as
reassuring as you might hope.
Then we have a Tallis Steelyard novella.
Tallis Steelyard and the Rustic Idyll
When he is asked to oversee the performance of the celebrated ‘Ten
Speeches’, Tallis Steelyard realises that his unique gifts as a poet have
finally been recognised. He may now truly call himself the leading poet of
his generation.
Then the past comes back to haunt him, and his immediate future involves too
much time in the saddle, being asked to die in a blue silk dress, blackmail
and the abuse of unregulated intoxicants. All this is set in delightful
countryside as he is invited to be poet in residence at a lichen festival.
And finally, for the first time in print we proudly present
Maljie, the episodic memoirs of a lady.
In his own well-chosen words, Tallis Steelyard reveals to us the life of
Maljie, a lady of his acquaintance. In no particular order we hear about her
bathing with clog dancers, her time as a usurer, pirate, and the
difficulties encountered when one tries to sell on a kidnapped orchestra. We
enter a world of fish, pet pigs, steam launches, theological disputation,
and the use of water under pressure to dispose of foul-smelling birds. Oh
yes, and we learn how the donkey ended up on the roof.
All a mere 99p each